Monday, July 29, 2013

I Heart Damselflies

Although damselflies are smaller and weaker fliers than dragonflies, I find them equally as interesting to observe. I sometimes have to look a little hard to find these little guys, but they are generally easier to photograph as they seem to stay still longer. Here are a few of the species  I've encountered over this past week, most of which were at the local ponds/wetlands.

Rambur's Forktail


Rambur's Forktails are one of the most prominent damselflies found around ponds and wetlands. There are currently a large number of them at the Viera Wetlands.


This is how most of them are spending time right now. When damselflies mate, the male can be seen on top, clasping the female's thorax with the terminal appendages on the end of its abdomen. The  female loops forward so copulation can be completed. In this heart-like position (which lasts for various amounts of time), the connected damselflies are still able to travel about.


The pair usually then separates so the female can go lay her eggs. It looked to me like the female laid her eggs on the male in this pair that I observed?

mating Rambur's Forktails

There is also a variation of female Rambur's that is orange, which I believe is what this is. I only saw one of these at the wetlands.

color variant female Rambur's Forktail

This past weekend I took a short trip to Missouri to visit some friends. I found this Azure Bluet (I think) one evening while I was out wandering around. This species was quite vibrant, well at least the male was, and easy to find!

male Azure Bluet eating a mosquito

Another reason I love to see damselflies, as well as dragonflies, around is they consume those ever so pesky mosquitoes that are always preying upon me. As I was photographing this damselfly, it captured a blood filled mosquito (that had probably just stung me).


It didn't take the damselfly long to eat up the mosquito!

female Azure Bluet

Have a great week:)

22 comments:

  1. You know I like a good Damsel, lovely shots Tammy.

    ReplyDelete
  2. the shot eating the mosquito was pretty awesome! even if it was your recycled lunch! :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Totally and utterly exquisite Tammy, photography at its best.
    Take care, Gordon.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is, without a doubt, the best damselpost ever made. Eating a blood-filled mosquito??!!!
    Wow. Also, your new banner is fully legit.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sorry I've been away from your blog for so long (my daughter is still in hospital, so that's where I am as well.) I see I've come back just in time to admire these gorgeous photos of yours. I LOVE damselflies!

    ReplyDelete
  6. That position is so awkward it took me a minute to wrap my head around what was happening! Very cool on the blood-sucker- you and that damselfly are now blood-sisters or something...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Beautiful pictures of the damselflies.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well I didn't even know those little ones had special names! Damselflies. Great captures!
    xo Catherine

    ReplyDelete
  9. Brilliant set Tammy, love the colour variant, very smart :-)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Super series of 'damsel' images.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hey Tammy,
    Wonderful shots!!
    So nice to see them in these love figures. It's a beautiful spectacle which
    you've photographed very well!!

    Many greetings,
    Marco

    ReplyDelete
  12. We have a lot more dragonflies here then damselflies. Lots of really cool colors and up close shots. Thanks for sharing the info:)

    ReplyDelete
  13. Great macros Tammy! I never knew the little ones were called something other than a dragon fly. Thanks for the education!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hola Tammy imagenes magnificas de libelulas y ademas nos muestras varias especies todas ellas muy bellas.Un abrazo

    ReplyDelete
  15. I would like to photograph it .. It's really colorful and beautiful.. Bravo Tammy

    ReplyDelete
  16. Tammy: great photos. The mating of these insects has always baffled me. I'm also doing a lot of macro lately.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Fantastic pictures - upper class!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Impresionantes tus fotos del micromundo amiga tammy. Un fuerte abrazo desde Extremadura

    ReplyDelete
  19. Fantastic post, Tammy!
    Right into my second after birds!
    Your mating Rambur's Forktail male has parasites on his thorax, the female in such a position would be totally unable to lay her eggs on the male.
    I will soon publish on this problem but here the parasites are red!
    I'll be back tomorrow...
    Cheerio!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Very nice. Really liked the macros of the dragon flies.

    ReplyDelete

I greatly appreciate your comments!